All posts by Peter Berg

New tutorial videos for our Atlatl Kits

We have recently added new tutorial videos where Bob Berg explains how to put together our most popular atlatl kits: the Catatonk, Catatonk Hunter, Kanakadea and Nanticoke. (All of our kits are available to purchase in the Shop.)

Now you can follow along step-by-step as Bob shows you how to put your atlatl kit together.

You can find the videos (with accompanying text instructions) under the “Kit Tutorials” heading to the left. They’re also right here:

 

Kanakadea Atlatl Kit

 

Nanticoke Atlatl Kit

 

Catatonk Atlatl Kit & Catatonk Hunter Atlatl Kit

How to set up a One Tarp Tent (with a door and a floor)

And now for something completely different!

Bob Berg​ demonstrates how to make a simple tent (with a door and a floor) with just one tarp, one piece of rope, one pole, and four stakes. Total cost: About $15. Total time: 5-10 minutes. Save time and money the next time you go camping!

Materials needed:
-Tarp (12’x16′)
-10′ Rope
-8′ Pole
-4+ Stakes
-Hammer or a rock to pound in the stakes

*NOTE: The tarp’s dimensions must be a ratio of 4:3. If you would like to build a bigger or smaller tent, just scale all the dimensions appropriately. (eg: 15′ x 20′ tarp, with a 10′ pole and a 12-15′ rope).*

Atlatling with Mittens – Why a “Y” Atlatl is great in the winter

Have you ever shot an atlatl in the winter when it’s so cold that your fingers feel like they’re about to fall off? We have. That’s why we recommend a fingerless “Y” style atlatl like the Kanakadea for cold weather atlatling. Check out this video of Bob showing off his winter atlatl technique!

Greetings from the Silver River Knap-In in Florida

This weekend we are at the 7th Annual Silver River Knap-In and Primitive Technology Show in Florida. The show runs all day on Saturday and Sunday (the 18th and 19th) at Silver Springs State Park. We’ll be hosting ISACs every day, and selling atlatls all weekend. Come see us if you are in the area!

Where we get our wood from

A lot of people ask us where we get the wood that we use to make our atlatls and darts. Thunderbird Atlatl uses Ash and Cherry logs that we personally cut and mill from our family’s land in Upstate New York. We process it on our own lumber mill.

From Thunderbird Atlatl owner/founder Bob Berg:

“We harvested all these logs, destined to become atlatls and darts from family property in the Catskill Mountains. We saw them, following the natural grain of the wood to produce darts that are straight and true. Every part of the log is used. Some of the sawdust makes its way into our gardens after composting it for a couple of years after using it for bedding in our chicken coop. We use the bark for dressing around our blueberries. Many local horse farmers use the rest of the sawdust for bedding their horses. Boards that are not used for darts become atlatls or flooring.”

Ash and Cherry logs at Thunderbird Atlatl